Best Rumble builds

by 1d ago
Thumbnail image courtesy of Riot Games

Rumble's builds as an AP carry are pretty varied beyond his core of early magic penetration. As such, he has some unique build paths based on the enemy composition and how he chooses to deal damage or deal with the mix of damage presented by the enemy team. Because of Rumble's early health through Liandry's, runes and masteries, resists are particularly potent in making the firestarter as durable as he is damaging.

RELATED: A guide to Rumble

The Classic

  1. Doran’s Shield + Health Potion

  2. Haunting Guise

  3. Sorcerer Shoes

  4. Liandry’s Torment

  5. Zhonya’s Hourglass

  6. Void Staff

  7. Rabadon’s Deathcap

  8. Guardian Angel

Against Heavy AP

  1. Doran’s Shield + Health Potion

  2. Haunting Guise

  3. Sorcerer Shoes

  4. Negatron Cloak

  5. Liandry’s Torment

  6. Abyssal Scepter

  7. Zhonya’s Hourglass

  8. Void Staff

  9. Guardian Angel

RELATED: 8 quick tips for Rumble

Against heavy AD
  1. Doran’s Shield + Health Potion

  2. Haunting Guise

  3. Sorcerer Shoes

  4. Liandry’s Torment

  5. Zhonya’s Hourglass

  6. Void Staff

  7. Rabadon's Deathcap

  8. Guardian Angel

Against majority squishies
  1. Doran’s Shield + Health Potion

  2. Haunting Guise

  3. Sorcerer Shoes

  4. Liandry’s Torment

  5. Zhonya’s Hourglass

  6. Void Staff

  7. Rabadon's Deathcap

  8. Guardian Angel

Against majority tanks
  1. Doran’s Shield + Health Potion

  2. Haunting Guise

  3. Sorcerer Shoes

  4. Liandry’s Torment

  5. Zhonya’s Hourglass

  6. Void Staff

  7. Rylai's Crystal Scepter

  8. Rabadon's Deathcap if ahead, or Luden's Echo if even or behind

Gabriel Zoltan-Johan is a News Editor at theScore esports and the head analyst for the University of Toronto League of Legends team. His (public) musings can be found on his Twitter.

8 quick tips for Rumble

by 1d ago
Thumbnail image courtesy of Riot Games

Rumble is one of the more difficult champions to play to perfection. The tiny Yordle's mechanic are full of tricks and surprises, which often can turn your small leg up into a giant robot leg up instead. These tips and tricks focus around ease and usability mostly, to make your time with Rumble more focused on what to do with your advantages rather than how you secure them.

RELATED: A guide to Rumble

  1. Use Electro-Harpoon to keep your heat up at yellow stages so that you can continue using amplified spells

  2. Harass enemies from afar with Flamespitter by using your stop key (Default S) to stand outside of turret aggro range or further away from them

  3. Do not smartcast your equalizer when starting to play Rumble — it is very difficult to land consistently good ones and sometimes you will have some incredibly bad results

  4. If you do want to smartcast your ultimate, hold down your ultimate key to see the trajectory and right-click if you want to cancel the input

  5. Flamespitter does damage every 0.25 seconds, so you should be able to pivot Rumble quickly to do damage to things you want to do damage to, such as using Q to last hit a minion quickly and turning away

  6. No form of crowd control stops Flamespitter

  7. Build up heat before minions spawn so that you have access to the enhanced version of your Flamespitter once you enter the lane, giving you greater lane bully potential

  8. If you overheat casting Electro-Harpoon, you can continue casting other Electro-Harpoons for the duration of the Overheat passive

RELATED: Best Rumble builds

Gabriel Zoltan-Johan is a News Editor at theScore esports and the head analyst for the University of Toronto League of Legends team. His (public) musings can be found on his Twitter.

A guide to Rumble

by 1d ago
Thumbnail image courtesy of Riot Games

Rumble has been a staple of competitive play since his introduction in Season 1. His game-changing ultimates, low-cooldown damage abilities, and resource-free design make him incredibly fun and interesting for people to play as well, yielding a decent level of popularity in solo queue and a very significant level of popularity in higher ELO. Once you master Rumble, he's a champion that can completely change the tide of a fight. In the truest sense, he's your go-to 1v9'er in the top lane.

Runes

Magic Penetration Reds, Scaling Health Yellows, Ability Power Blues, Ability Power Quintessences

Magic penetration reds synergize with Rumble’s early itemization and give him 37.8 magic penetration once he completes his early game combo of Haunting Guise and Sorcerer Shoes. This is enough to shred through almost a full Negatron Cloak. Scaling health yellows give Rumble some much-needed durability, moreso against tanks than armor would just due to their propensity to not deal attack damage as heavily. AP blues and quints give Rumble even more early damage to bully opponents out of lane.

Masteries

Eighteen points in ferocity give Rumble access to the most possible damage. Battle Trance should be taken over Double-Edged Sword for a few reasons. Firstly, your damage over time will keep your Battle Trance stacks up, and Deathfire Touch will as well. Secondly, it does all this without the downside of having Double-Edged Sword’s additional damage inflicted onto you. Deathfire Touch’s nerfs don’t affect Rumble, and the damage helps him substantially as he seeks to burn down enemies with his multiple damage-over-time area-of-effect spells.

Veteran Scars will help you with your early laning and ability to survive the early game more than Runic Armor would. Insight gives you lower Flash and Teleport cooldowns which would be incredibly useful for coming into fights more consistently and landing those crucial Equalizers. As such, 12 in Resolve is more worth it than 12 in Cunning would be.

Skill order

First six levels: QEWQQR

Your Flamespitter is your most active and useful ability for a few reasons. One is that it will frequently help build up and maintain heat, as well as your Deathfire Touch damage and your Battle Trance stacks. But it’s also your best ability to harass enemies due to its high damage and ability to hit through minion waves, terrain and other enemies. It should be maxed in basically all circumstances.

Putting points into your Electro-Harpoon second continues to add to your damage and harass, provides an easy way to keep your Heat in the yellow, and also provides a ranged option to CS if need be. The slow is also great for early gank assistance in the long lane.

Your Scrap shield should be maxed last, but leveled early for its utility. An early level could be the difference between surviving a gank and not, and it gives you a comfortable shield against minion harass when using your Flamespitter to harass champions through a creep wave. It also has a secondary usage of managing heat. Your ultimate should be leveled up whenever available, due to its sheer impact and importance.

Build order

Rumble benefits greatly from a large amount of early magic penetration in order to keep bullying his opponents and do damage to squishy enemies. Early magic penetration also helps against tanks who will grab magic resistance in the form of an early Spectre’s Cowl or Negatron Cloak. Rushing into Liandry’s as early as possible with your Sorcerer Shoes will make it incredibly difficult to take trades with you, due to the magic penetration and burn damage. Your AP scalings are incredibly good on your damage as well, so going into heavier AP items are beneficial to you and your team.

RELATED: Best Rumble builds

  1. Doran’s Shield + Health Potion

  2. Haunting Guise

  3. Sorcerer Shoes

  4. Liandry’s Torment

  5. Zhonya’s Hourglass

  6. Void Staff

  7. Rabadon’s Deathcap

  8. Guardian Angel

Playstyle

The early game is about Rumble's status as an AP Carry and lane bully. However, building into these offensive stats early on does make you a little more vulnerable, so be sure to play forward based on the information you have from your vision and the minimap. Try and track the jungler and play based on where you suspect he is. Use your pushing advantage against most every champ to get ahead and ward deep to have a greater warning if the enemy jungler is showing up. Rumble in his current 7.5/7.6 state can win most trades one versus one when even, so it really is a matter of how much you neutralize the effect of the enemy jungler’s pressure in order to stay ahead and outscale your opponent.

RELATED: 8 quick tips for Rumble

The mid game is Rumble’s time to swing fights one way or the other. His Equalizer is more than just an equalizing presence, it’s a complete game-changer. A well-placed Rumble ultimate in a teamfight can cause chaos and remove people from a fight. Either using it to cover a key corridor or to split the frontline tanks and backline damage dealers are ideal scenarios. Any crowd control that can keep them in the Equalizer is doubly effective too, such as Ashe ultimate or Orianna ultimate.

The late game is the exact same thing as the mid game, except Rumble also has the added benefit of being able to split push fairly effectively. His damage versus tanks puts a lot of pressure on the map, stretching it such that his team can use that pressure to effectively control neutral objectives or siege towers on other parts of the map.

Gabriel Zoltan-Johan is a news editor at theScore esports and the head analyst for the University of Toronto League of Legends team. His (public) musings can be found on his Twitter.

The best fails from Week 8 of the 2017 Spring Split

theScore esports Staff 2d ago

Yes Krepo, Tundle and Stresh are really good for LP.

In the penultimate week of the regular season, EU experienced their fair share of broadcast flubs, Bang slapped Wolf and Piglet couldn't quite set up a proper ambush.

With plenty of missed Flashes across all regions, here are the best fails from Week 8.

For more video interviews and highlights, be sure to subscribe to theScore esports on YouTube.

League of Lessons: Shake Hands With The Lucian

by 2d ago
Thumbnail image courtesy of Riot Games

League of Lessons is a weekly series about learning to play League of Legends after a seven-year absence, trying not to break the Summoner's Code in Solo Queue, and all the wonderful parts that come along with the journey to Level 30.

I’ve started to queue on my own more reliably, forgoing the safety offered by other members of theScore esports’ editorial staff ― though, in truth, it often just felt like I was being placed against opponents I probably shouldn’t be facing.

That was part of my motivation to fly solo, but perhaps more than that, I really wanted to reach Level 18 to get my keystone mastery, and I couldn’t wait any longer for supervising editor Sean Wetselaar to grace me with the presence of his Ivern play.

'Pick a real support'

Not sure where it stacks up against Yasuo, but Lucian being in the free rotation was the worst part of the week. In almost every game, my ADC played Lucian. Similarly, every game, my ADC thought they were Doublelift.

They weren’t.

The most frustrating part was a pair of back-to-back games where my Lucians had very different opinions on how a support should play ― and they voiced those opinions loudly and repeatedly.

Malzahar was my focus for this week; I thought he was an interesting support choice and his ultimate is really effective. I locked him in, built standard support items, got to lane... and my Lucian dived in and died at Level 2.

“I knew you were a troll. Next time, pick a real support that can heal.” Not that I’m an expert, but I guess he hadn’t seen any high-level games of League in a really long time.

RELATED: League of Lessons: I succumbed to the salt, and I'm ashamed

Not a great start, but I tried to remain calm. I kept playing my game, ensuring ward coverage and trying to follow up when he dove in recklessly. Laning against a Tristana and Karma, he was 0-3 pretty early on from all the aggression, even when we were obviously behind.

He said he was just going to farm. "Okay," I thought, "I’ll go set something up mid for our Yasuo." We score a kill on Vel’Koz with my ult. The Lucian says “OH GREAT, my support abandoned me,” this time in all chat.

“That Malzahar is the only reason your team is in this at all,” the enemy’s jungler replied.

The delicious chat victory was followed by a brawl in all chat. The other team ridiculed the Lucian and gave me props. I got some honors after the game, I reported the Lucian and got a notification that someone had been punished because of a recent report shortly thereafter.

I feel good about my play that game. We lost, but I don’t feel like I was the biggest reason for that. Our jungler had a rough go (0/13/10) and was a non-factor very early on in the game. I set up the Lucian a lot after the laning phase but he was as indignant as ever. I went 7/7/13 in a 50-minute game.

'Don’t play a healing support'

I decided I’d try to play a game on Soraka, and was met with the opposite reaction. Again, my Lucian (basically a position of its own at this point) wasn’t happy with my pick.

“I hate support players who play healers, it’s for bitches... don’t play a healing support.”

I guess I just can’t win!

I was spam healing him in fights, saving ults for him, but he just wanted to die. He had a death wish.

“Dude, you know you can heal in fights, right?”

We lost, with the Lucian hard-feeding and going 11/14/9.

I was done. I queued as top, got into a game as Rumble that was remade, and then logged off to prevent myself from putting my hand through the monitor.

Touched by a Fangrill

I eventually returned, but this time decided I’d mess around with a new support. At least that way, I’d have the joy of learning something even if the game was horrible.

I locked in Taric, my ADC locked in Ezreal. His username was C9 Fangrill.

If they were a fangrill, then they had learned a lot from Sneaky. Our TOP LANE LUCIAN started flaming the entire team and eventually ragequit the game. It was 4v5 time.

The Fangrill had remained silent the entire time, displaying incredible skill. Their reaction times were really good, and they were not deterred by the ragequit. We took the fight to the enemy’s base. He flashed over the wall, I panic-ulted him. He got down to extremely low health in his duel.

The Taric ult went off, he cleaned up. We would ultimately win the 4v5, with the Fangrill finishing 17/4/7.

Honestly, it felt like this was a high-level player’s smurf. I’m glad we won, if only because the Lucian’s toxicity was not rewarded by a loss.

Pool Party Panacea?

A thought struck me about this week, and I can’t help but include it here.

I’m in the Bahamas this week for the Hearthstone Championship Tour ― or so I’ve been told. Truthfully, the edges were starting to fray in my LoL play. Doing a bit of digging, I discovered that New Providence ― the island where Nassau is located ― became known as “the sanitarium of the Western Hemisphere.”

I thought nothing of it at first, but I’m pretty sure I saw Pool Party Graves spying on me as I was playing Hearthstone on my tablet Monday evening. I can only conclude that my colleagues think I’ve contracted the most dangerous disease of all.

Toxicity.

The road so far

Stats to-date: 33-35 (48.5%) in normal modes

Top champions so far: Soraka (6-5), Braum (6-4), Alistar (4-3), Miss Fortune (3-0)

Favorite new champion of the week: Malzahar (2-4, god bless)

Truly outrageous focus champion for next week: Taric

Throw of the week: Malzahar (Support), 0/6/5

I won a game on Rammus game of the week: Top lane, 5/7/14

Josh "Gauntlet" Bury is a news editor for theScore esports and is ashamed to say that he actually loves League of Legends now. You can find him on Twitter.

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